Taiwanese cinema and its artists have elicited praise from critics and audiences worldwide for more than thirty years. None more so than innovative director Hou Hsiao-hsien, whose originality, style, and perspective has created possibilities for the medium that reach far beyond the Taiwanese film industry. Consistently expanding his approach and vision while delving into the otherwise ignored aspects of the art form, Hou has opened doors and created possibilities for the medium as a whole. The Dryden Theatre is proud to present six films that illuminate this director’s singular style and passion for the art of storytelling. International retrospective organized by Richard I… [read more]

In a career that spanned a half-century, John Ford created a wealth of films that established him firmly in the pantheon of the greatest directors Hollywood ever produced. And the greatest Ford films featured two actors who became iconic under his banner—John Wayne and Henry Fonda. This series presents essential films, and offers an opportunity to compare and contrast the work of both actors in the John Ford oeuvre. Wayne was Ford’s definitive Western hero, but Fonda was important for the quiet integrity and evocative performances he brought to such historic and literary works… [read more]

What are vampires, really? They sleep all day, come and go as they please; they are full of superstitions and are picky eaters. In recent cinema history, directors have taken it upon themselves to explore the effects of vampirism, purposely avoiding the traditions set by Bram Stoker. What if there were people out there whose minds had simply fooled them into believing they were among “the undead”? What would the psychological effects look like? This series of four films poses these questions. In each of the films, vampirism can be seen as ambiguous or simply devoid of the traditional vampire folklore, making it that much more terrifying. In Ganja and Hess [read more]

The Labor Series, sponsored by the Rochester Labor Council and organized and curated in collaboration with Jon Garlock, is now celebrating its twenty-fifth year. To commemorate this anniversary, we will be screening eleven films selected from past programs. Each one serves to remind us of the challenges facing workers in every walk of life and how indebted we are to them.

The series kicks off with Nine to Five, a comedy on a very serious subject: women’s rights in the workplace. Next is the powerful and not-to-be-missed documentary Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price, and the following week we screen Workingman’s Death, a moving tribute to the common laborer. Charlie Chaplin’s classic Modern Times and Bill Duke’s 1984 The Killing Floor round out… [read more]

The Dryden silent film series continues with rare films from George Eastman House and special prints from the Library of Congress, the UCLA Film & Television Archive, the British Film Institute, and Universal Studios. Highlights include Pola Negri in Barbed Wire, one of three films in this calendar marking the hundredth anniversary of World War I; The Goose Woman featuring Marie Dressler and Jack Pickford… [read more]