• Monday, March 30th, 1:30 pm The Red Shoes

    Senior Matinee. Presented free to seniors (62+) on Monday afternoons through October. Beginning this March, our senior matinee screenings are fully incorporated into our regular film calendar. Cinematic classics from the George Eastman House collection will be presented in 35mm… [read more]


  • Tuesday, March 31st, 8:00 pm The Beloved Rogue

    James Card. One of James Card’s favorite films by one of his favorite stars, The Beloved Rogue is John Barrymore’s most deliberately athletic film, similar to those of Douglas Fairbanks while still retaining Barrymore’s wit and slyness. The Beloved Rogue is certainly no more historically accurate than any Hollywood epic in its tale concerning medieval French poet-qua-criminal François Villon (best known through Ronald Colman’s… [read more]


  • Wednesday, April 1st, 8:00 pm JFK

    History. History lesson #3. A stubborn New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison (Kevin Costner) is convinced that the official story of Kennedy assassination is nothing but a cover up for a huge conspiracy. A highly controversial and still much-discussed legal thriller.

    “I think it was the most distressing film I’ve had to make [read more]


  • Thursday, April 2nd, 8:00 pm Petropolis: Aerial Perspectives on the Alberta Tar Sands and Water and Power

    Man-Altered Landscapes. The unspoiled boreal forests of northern Canada, compressed for 200 million years, have created the world’s second largest oil reserve, roughly the size of England. The tar sands, a mixture of sand and a heavy crude oil called bitumen, are mined in open pits after being forced to the surface by injecting superheated water into the ground. This massive industrialized mining effort has far-reaching impacts on the land, air, water, and climate although amazingly no comprehensive…[read more]


  • Friday, April 3rd, 8:00 pm The Leopard

    Technicolor. A grand scale epic, set in 1860s Sicily during the Risorgimento—the period that marked the end of Sicily’s existence as an independent monarchy and the emergence of an Italian state—The Leopard is a lavish, elegiac chronicle of the decline of an aristocratic family under the crushing weight of political change. Burt Lancaster is brilliant as the aging patriarch who can only stand aside and quietly observe his old ways being trampled…[read more]


  • Saturday, April 4th, 8:00 pm Spartacus

    Technicolor. Set in the first century BCE, this sweeping and subversive epic about the leader of a Roman slave rebellion has itself become something of an important historical event. The film’s success allowed the then-31-year-old Stanley Kubrick to pursue his directorial career relatively free from the demands of Hollywood. Kubrick balances the performances of a stellar cast—Kirk Douglas, Laurence Olivier…[read more]


  • Sunday, April 5th, 2:00 pm The Wizard of Oz

    Dryden Kids/Technicolor. If ever a film was meant to be seen on the big screen, this is it. Now a cultural icon, this adaptation of L. Frank Baum’s novel was one of the first films to be named to the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress. Judy Garland gives an endearing performance as the young Dorothy Gale, who is swept away by a tornado to the Land of Oz. A triumph of costumes, makeup, and set design, and featuring Harold Arlen’s Oscar-winning song “Over the Rainbow,” this film…[read more]


  • Monday, April 6th, 1:30 pm The Wizard of Oz

    Senior Matinee. Presented free to seniors (62+) on Monday afternoons through October. Beginning this March, our senior matinee screenings are fully incorporated into our regular film calendar. Cinematic classics from the George Eastman House collection will be presented in 35mm…[read more]


  • Tuesday, April 7th, 8:00 pm Tell Me Tonight

    James Card. Tell Me Tonight was part of “The Transition from Silence to Sound 1925–1933,” the very first series curator James Card programmed for the Dryden in 1951. Card may have scheduled the film as an example of an average early talkie, or perhaps an example of an imaginative, innovative use of sound. Who knows? What we do know is that he must have really liked the film, because he screened it no less than seven times in the first two decades of the Dryden… [read more]


  • Wednesday, April 8th, 8:00 pm The Green Berets

    History. History lesson #4. John Wayne directs John Wayne again, this time as an experienced colonel leading a squad of Green Berets to Vietnam, proclaiming that “out here, due process is a bullet,” and dead set to prevent the communist domination of the world.

    “A film so unspeakable, so stupid, so rotten and…[read more]


  • Thursday, April 9th, 8:00 pm Topophilia

    Man-Altered Landscape/World Premiere/Director in Person! Topophilia traces the 800-mile path of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) and examines one of the most historically productive oil routes in the United States. Completed in 1977, TAPS runs both above and underground through pristine Alaskan terrain—up mountain passes, over tundra, and across hundreds of rivers and streams. From numerous extraction points on the North Slope, hot crude oil is moved the entire length of Alaska to the…[read more]


  • Friday, April 10th, 8:00 pm Juliet of the Spirits

    Technicolor. Giulietta Masina plays a housewife who drifts into a private world of memories and fantasies to escape the hard facts of a philandering husband and a crumbling marriage. Fellini’s first color feature imagines his wife’s interior life through Technicolor compositions that transform the banal routine of her housebound existence into what one critic accurately described as “an imperial-sized fantasy of a physical opulence to make…[read more]


  • Saturday, April 11th, 8:00 pm Figures in a Landscape

    Technicolor. MacConnachie (Robert Shaw) and Ansell (Malcolm McDowell) are figures in a landscape, escaped prisoners of war of an unknown ethnicity, still handcuffed and on a desperate run across an unidentified hostile countryside, relentlessly hunted by a mysterious black helicopter while discussing everything—from contraception to psychoanalysis. Undoubtedly the most formally radical, almost experimental…[read more]


  • Sunday, April 12th, 2:00 pm For a Few Dollars More

    Technicolor. Clint Eastwood’s impossibly cool gunslinger returns in this sequel to Fistful of Dollars that places him in opposition to Mortimer, a determined bounty hunter (Lee Van Cleef), and Indio, a reckless bandit (Gian Maria Volonte), in a tense moral triangle with greed and revenge at its center. Massimo Dallamano’s cinematography captures gallons of blood and clouds of dust the way only…[read more]


  • Monday, April 13th, 1:30 pm Tell Me Tonight

    Senior Matinee. Presented free to seniors (62+) on Monday afternoons through October. Beginning this March, our senior matinee screenings are fully incorporated into our regular film calendar. Cinematic classics from the George Eastman House collection will be presented in 35mm… [read more]


  • Tuesday, April 14th, 8:00 pm Dodsworth

    James Card. Dodsworth, one of the most intelligent films of the 1930s, is a study of a marriage in crisis. Produced by the legendary Samuel Goldwyn and directed by the great William Wyler, Dodsworth was one of eight films the two collaborated on over the next ten years. Based on the Sinclair Lewis novel, Sidney Howard adapted his Broadway play to the screen and Walter Huston reprised his role of Sam Dodsworth, which he had played more than three hundred times on the stage…[read more]


  • Wednesday, April 15th, 8:00 pm Sarajevo

    History. History lesson #5. Shortly after his escape from Nazi Germany and before directing an unbroken chain of immortal classics such as Letter from an Unknown Woman, La ronde, Le plaisir, The Earrings of Madame de… and Lola Montès, the undisputed master of graceful camera choreography Max Ophüls crafted this poisonous cocktail of doomed romance in doomed times, both based on historic events. The Archduke Franz…[read more]


  • Thursday, April 16th, 8:00 pm California Company Town

    Man-Altered Landscapes. This strikingly shot essay film casts a probing, clear-eyed gaze at the landscape of California towns abandoned by the industries that created them—onetime boomtowns now haunted by the twilight of the American promise.

    “Appearing at a moment…[read more]


  • Friday, April 17th, 8:00 pm Barbarella

    Technicolor. The year is 40000, and positronic ray (“all persons and objects in its path are deminimumized to the 4th level”) inventor Dr. Durand Durand has disappeared. Jane Fonda is Barbarella, a cosmonaut in a capricious skintight space suit, in charge of bringing Durand Durand home safely. Crash landing on the planet Lythion, Barbarella meets a whole cast of unfamiliar creatures and contraptions…[read more]


  • Sunday, April 19th, 2:00 pm The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean

    Technicolor. In this film based on the true story of Pecos County, Texas, Justice of the Peace Roy Bean, director and co-screenwriter (with John Milius) dispenses with any attempt at character discovery and paints a brawling, tumultuous, and sometimes very funny portrait of the man-myth and his life in the dying days of the West. The always watchable and screen-filling Paul Newman is Judge Roy Bean…[read more]


  • Monday, April 20th, 1:30 pm Dodsworth

    Senior Matinee. Presented free to seniors (62+) on Monday afternoons through October. Beginning this March, our senior matinee screenings are fully incorporated into our regular film calendar. Cinematic classics from the George Eastman House collection will be presented in 35mm… [read more]


  • Tuesday, April 21st, 8:00 pm Pandora’s Box

    James Card. For James Card, there was only one Louise Brooks. The cineaste referred to his lifelong infatuation as an emotional devotion that had begun at the age of 14, calling Brooks an inadvertent femme fatale who could in no way be coquettish or even deliberately seductive—ideal for the role of Lulu in Pandora’s Box, heroine of Frank Wedekind’s beloved German plays. An innocently immoral sexual predator, Lulu discards …[read more]


  • Wednesday, April 22nd, 8:00 pm Team America: World Police

    History. History lesson #6. This provocative, volatile political essay from the hearts and minds behind the popular South Park television series clearly shows that Hollywood was concocting devious plans to assassinate popular Asian leaders already a decade ago. Multitalented Trey Parker (as Kim Jong Il, Matt Damon, Tim Robbins, Sean Penn, Michael Moore, Helen Hunt, and Susan Sarandon) and Matt Stone…[read more]


  • Sunday, April 26th, 2:00 pm Norte, The End of History

    Rochester Premiere. An embittered law student commits a brutal double murder; a family man takes the fall and is forced into a harsh prison sentence; a mother and her two children wander the countryside looking for some kind of redemption. Lav Diaz’s epic reimagining of Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment is… [read more]


  • Tuesday, April 28th, 8:00 pm Sucker Punch

    James Card. When we were thinking about how James Card, as an archivist and as a curator, would have felt and behaved in the 21st century—which films he would have collected and programmed?—and taking into consideration everything we knew about this beloved rogue as a human being and as a professional—from his passion for broad drama… [read more]


  • Wednesday, April 29th, 8:00 pm A Sampler of Cinematic Gems from the Museum’s Collection

    House Treasures. This is the inaugural program of a new series dedicated to the appreciation of George Eastman House’s renowned collection of over 28,000 films, carefully selected from the world’s cinematic legacy. The show begins with the amazing short film that paved the way to the introduction of sound, [Theodore W. Case Sound Test # 4: Canary][read more]