• Friday, February 27th, 8:00 pm The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Sultan’s Jester

    Technicolor. The third Hollywood adaptation of the classic Mark Twain novel (and the first in glorious Technicolor!) sees the mischievous boy going through all his iconic pranks: the ingenious fence-whitewashing episode, the courting of Becky Thatcher, rafting down the Mississippi river, attending his own funeral, saving the local drunk from the gallows, and finally a daring escape through a gorgeously designed cave… [read more]


  • Saturday, February 28th, 8:00 pm Point and Shoot

    Conscience. Point and Shoot follows Matt VanDyke, a timid 26-year-old, who left home in Baltimore in 2006 and set off on a self-described “crash course in manhood.” He bought a motorcycle and a video camera and began a three-year, 35,000-mile motorcycle trip through Northern Africa and the Middle East. While traveling, he struck up an unlikely friendship with a Libyan hippie, and when revolution broke out in Libya… [read more]


  • Sunday, March 1st, 2:00 pm The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Sultan’s Jester

    Dryden Kids/Technicolor. The third Hollywood adaptation of the classic Mark Twain novel (and the first in glorious Technicolor!) sees the mischievous boy going through all his iconic pranks: the ingenious fence-whitewashing episode, the courting of Becky Thatcher, rafting down the Mississippi river, attending his own funeral, saving the local drunk from the gallows, and finally a daring escape through a gorgeously designed cave… [read more]


  • Monday, March 2nd, 1:30 pm The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Sultan’s Jester

    Senior Matinee. Presented free to seniors (62+) on Monday afternoons through October. Beginning this March, our senior matinee screenings are fully incorporated into our regular film calendar. Cinematic classics from the George Eastman House collection will be presented in 35mm… [read more]


  • Tuesday, March 3rd, 8:00 pm Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

    Mike Nichols. Edward Albee’s play about a pair of dysfunctional academics held a dark mirror to the boozy, brawling marriage of Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton—the “it” couple of the international jet set whose turbulent private life had become harrowingly public. Broadway wunderkind Mike Nichols’s brilliant screen adaptation… [read more]


  • Wednesday, March 4th, 8:00 pm 20,000 Days on Earth

    Rochester Premiere. 20,000 Days on Earth is an inventive, lyrical ode to creativity and an intimate examination of the artistic process of musician, novelist, scriptwriter (The Proposition, Lawless), and cultural icon Nick Cave. In their debut feature, directors Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard fuse drama and documentary, weaving a staged day in Cave’s life with never-before-seen verité observation of his creative cycle… [read more]


  • Thursday, March 5th, 8:00 pm A Year Along the Abandoned Road and An Injury to One

    Man-Altered Landscapes. An Injury to One provides a corrective—and absolutely compelling—glimpse of a particularly volatile moment in early 20th-century American labor history: the rise and fall of Butte, Montana. Specifically, it chronicles the mysterious death of Wobbly organizer Frank Little, a story whose grisly details have taken on a legendary status in the state. Much of the extant evidence is inscribed upon the landscape… [read more]


  • Friday, March 6th, 8:00 pm Follow Thru

    Technicolor. “That gallant idol, Charles Rogers, and the cherubic-faced Nancy Carroll, appear together and in the company of several comedians in Follow Thru, a film in Technicolor on the screen of the Paramount. By far the most amusing character in this cinema offering is Jack Haley, who is seen in the rôle of Jack Martin, an eccentric young millionaire, whose pet aversion is women. Mr. Haley was also in the stage musical comedy, from which… [read more]


  • Saturday, March 7th, 8:00 pm On the Beach

    What Everyone’s Reading. Adapted from Nevil Shute’s novel, Stanley Kramer’s gripping film presents an early entry in the post-apocalypse genre, where the consequences of World War III leave Earth a nuclear wasteland. Gregory Peck leads a stellar cast of survivors (including Ava Gardner, Anthony Perkins, and Fred Astaire) attempting to make the most of their final days on Earth. Amid the bleak vision of the future, the characters seek to preserve… [read more]


  • Sunday, March 8th, 2:00 pm - 2:00 pm Leave Her to Heaven

    Technicolor. An aspiring novelist (Cornel Wilde) meets a young socialite (Gene Tierney) and marries her in a blink of an eye, only to discover that his beautiful wife’s love is a highly flammable passion that threatens to devour anyone standing in its twisted way. This remarkable achievement—a proper film noir in sumptuous Technicolor—is celebrated by Martin Scorsese as one his favorite films of all time, and can also be viewed… [read more]


  • Monday, March 9th, 1:30 pm Follow Thru

    Senior Matinee. Presented free to seniors (62+) on Monday afternoons through October. Beginning this March, our senior matinee screenings are fully incorporated into our regular film calendar. Cinematic classics from the George Eastman House collection will be presented in 35mm… [read more]


  • Tuesday, March 10th, 8:00 pm Primary Colors

    Mike Nichols. Streamlined by director Mike Nichols and screenwriter Elaine May, Joe Klein’s sprawling, thinly veiled roman à clef about the 1992 Clinton presidential campaign becomes an intelligent and very funny satire about the bloody game of American politics. In a media-driven world of sound bites and spin doctors, young and stubbornly idealistic Henry Burton (Adrian Lester) continues to believe in the possibility of a politician who actually… [read more]


  • Wednesday, March 11th, 8:00 pm National Gallery

    Rochester Premiere. National Gallery takes the audience behind the scenes of a London institution, on a journey to the heart of a museum inhabited by masterpieces of Western art from the Middle Ages to the 19th century. National Gallery is the portrait of a place, its way of working and relations with the world, its staff and public, and its paintings. In a perpetual and dizzying game of mirrors, film watches painting watches film… [read more]


  • Thursday, March 12th, 8:00 pm Claw: A Fable and Stations of the Elevated

    Man-Altered Landscapes. Stations of the Elevated is a city symphony directed, produced, and edited by Manfred Kirchheimer. Shot on lush 16mm color reversal stock, the film weaves together vivid images of graffiti-covered elevated subway trains crisscrossing the gritty urban landscape of 1970s New York, to a commentary-free soundtrack that combines ambient city noise with jazz and gospel by Charles Mingus and Aretha Franklin. Gliding through the South Bronx… [read more]


  • Friday, March 13th, 8:00 pm The Gang’s All Here

    Technicolor. Perhaps the high point in the career of one of the great Hollywood choreographers, The Gang’s All Here was Busby Berkeley’s first foray into color. And not just any color: glorious Technicolor! Though the film is best remembered for the outrageous suggestiveness of the sets, costumes and banana props in Carmen Miranda’s performance of “The Lady in the Tutti Frutti Hat,” the story of a love triangle involving a soldier… [read more]


  • Saturday, March 14th, 8:00 pm Glorious Shorts!

    Technicolor. This diverse selection of shorts highlights the impact the introduction of three-color Technicolor had on filmmaking. The program opens with Dinner for Eight (Rodney Gilliam, US 1933, 10 min.), a fun promotional short for Southern California Edison Company and the first live-action film photographed in the three-color Technicolor process. This is followed by Service with a Smile (Roy Mack, US 1934, 17 min.), a playful comedy [read more]


  • Sunday, March 15th, 2:00 pm The Adventures of Robin Hood

    Technicolor. Arguably the greatest swashbuckler ever made, unquestionably the definitive Robin Hood film, this taught Lucas, Spielberg, and everyone else all they needed to know about the joys of action, adventure, and high-energy entertainment. The underrated master Michael Curtiz mixes memorably witty dialogue and Shakespearean romance with a courageous heroine, a beautiful hero, and villains who really enjoy being nasty, splashes them with Technicolor… [read more]


  • Monday, March 16th, 1:30 pm The Gang’s All Here

    Senior Matinee. Presented free to seniors (62+) on Monday afternoons through October. Beginning this March, our senior matinee screenings are fully incorporated into our regular film calendar. Cinematic classics from the George Eastman House collection will be presented in 35mm… [read more]


  • Tuesday, March 17th, 8:00 pm Corn’s-A-Poppin’

    New Restoration/Post-Screening Discussion. Scripted by 28-year-old Robert Altman after his disappointing sojourn as a Hollywood screenwriter, Corn’s-A-Poppin’ is a bargain-basement backstage musical that puts the corn in cornpone. Real-life crooner Jerry Wallace plays Johnny Wilson, the down-home star of the Pinwhistle Popcorn Hour, a low-rent variety show with acts ranging from ex–hog caller Lillian Gravelguard to Hobie Shepp and His Cow Town Wranglers… [read more]


  • Wednesday, March 18th, 8:00 pm Helen of Troy

    History. History lesson #1. Homer’s account of the Trojan War and the face that launched a thousand ships is sumptuously told with lavish sets and costumes and an international cast that includes Brigitte Bardot, Stanley Baker as Achilles, and Rosanna Podesta as the title character. Filming in Italy, journeyman director Wise cut his teeth here on the widescreen frame before directing such ’Scope classics as West Side Story[read more]


  • Thursday, March 19th, 8:00 pm London

    Man-Altered Landscapes. A fin-de-siècle personal portrait of an urban metropolis shot over a period of twelve months, which saw the election of John Major as prime minister, renewed IRA bombings, the “Black Wednesday” European monetary crisis, and the “fall of the house of Windsor.”

    “Neither documentary nor fiction… [read more]


  • Friday, March 20th, 8:00 pm Written on the Wind

    Technicolor. Rock Hudson, Robert Stack, Dorothy Malone, and Lauren Bacall star in this deliriously stylized melodrama about a Texas oil millionaire who begins to suspect his best friend of having an affair with his beautiful wife. With as much strife, intrigue, and over-the-top theatrics as a Shakespearean tragedy, this is one of the most ingenious and beautiful illustrations of the creative potential of Technicolor… [read more]


  • Saturday, March 21st, 8:00 pm Duel in the Sun

    Technicolor. A screen spectacle in the manner of Gone With the Wind, this western/melodrama hybrid is an epic tale of inter-family rivalry and romance. Gregory Peck has never been as naughty and lascivious as he is here, diving for Jennifer Jones’s Pearl. Critics mocked the film’s lurid excesses by dubbing it Lust in the Dust; producer David O. Selznick winced all the way to the bank. No film can match this Technicolor dynamo… [read more]


  • Sunday, March 22nd, 2:00 pm The African Queen

    Technicolor. John Huston’s adventurous drama The African Queen—co-scripted by ace film critic James Agee and beautifully shot on location by the legendary Jack Cardiff—is the first and only pairing of two of Hollywood’s most iconic and independent stars, Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn. The boozy riverboat captain and the devout British missionary form an unlikely friendship by challenging each other’s ideological prejudices… [read more]


  • Monday, March 23rd, 1:30 pm Corn’s-A-Poppin’

    Senior Matinee. Presented free to seniors (62+) on Monday afternoons through October. Beginning this March, our senior matinee screenings are fully incorporated into our regular film calendar. Cinematic classics from the George Eastman House collection will be presented in 35mm… [read more]


  • Tuesday, March 24th, 8:00 pm Working Girl

    Mike Nichols. A working-class working girl (Melanie Griffith), eager to climb the ladder of career, uses her boss’s (Sigourney Weaver) absence to orchestrate an important merger deal, seducing a business partner (Harrison Ford) in the process. This original and energetic mixture of drama, thriller, comedy and romance is bursting with fine performances and plentiful hair, and has even been labeled as The Graduate for the… [read more]


  • Wednesday, March 25th, 8:00 pm The Alamo

    History. History lesson #2. John Wayne directs John Wayne as the legendary colonel Davy Crockett, leading a squad of volunteers to the Alamo to prevent the Mexican invasion of Texas. A grand educational epic, originally photographed in 70mm, and—according to some historians—even carrying some accurate historical details.

    “[The film was a] Cold War [scenario] that… [read more]


  • Thursday, March 26th, 8:00 pm The Forgotten Space

    Man-Altered Landscapes. The “forgotten space” of Allan Sekula and Noël Burch’s essay film is the sea—the oceans through which 90 percent of the world’s cargo now passes. At the heart of this space is the container box, which, since its invention in the 1950s, has become one of the most important mechanisms for the global spread of capitalism. The film follows the container box along the international supply chain, from ships to barges, trains… [read more]


  • Friday, March 27th, 8:00 pm The Red Shoes

    Technicolor. Hans Christian Andersen’s tale is just the starting point for this imaginative and moving classic— a landmark in the histories of both dance and cinema. An ambitious and obsessive dancer (the luminous Moira Shearer) falls under the spell of a tyrannical impresario (Anton Walbrook) and soon must choose between ballet and life. The intertwining of art and life is vividly expressed in every aspect of this beloved production, particularly Jack Cardiff’s… [read more]


  • Saturday, March 28th, 8:00 pm Cameraman: The Life and Work of Jack Cardiff

    Technicolor. Jack Cardiff’s career spanned an incredible nine of motion pictures’ first ten decades, and his work altered the look of films forever through his use of Technicolor photography. He was the genius behind no less than three films we are screening as part of our Technicolor series (Steel, The African Queen, and The Red Shoes). Craig McCall’s passionate film about the legendary cinematographer reveals… [read more]


  • Sunday, March 29th, 2:00 pm The Red Shoes

    Technicolor. Hans Christian Andersen’s tale is just the starting point for this imaginative and moving classic— a landmark in the histories of both dance and cinema. An ambitious and obsessive dancer (the luminous Moira Shearer) falls under the spell of a tyrannical impresario (Anton Walbrook) and soon must choose between ballet and life. The intertwining of art and life is vividly expressed in every aspect of this beloved production, particularly Jack Cardiff’s… [read more]


  • Monday, March 30th, 1:30 pm The Red Shoes

    Senior Matinee. Presented free to seniors (62+) on Monday afternoons through October. Beginning this March, our senior matinee screenings are fully incorporated into our regular film calendar. Cinematic classics from the George Eastman House collection will be presented in 35mm… [read more]


  • Tuesday, March 31st, 8:00 pm The Beloved Rogue

    James Card. One of James Card’s favorite films by one of his favorite stars, The Beloved Rogue is John Barrymore’s most deliberately athletic film, similar to those of Douglas Fairbanks while still retaining Barrymore’s wit and slyness. The Beloved Rogue is certainly no more historically accurate than any Hollywood epic in its tale concerning medieval French poet-qua-criminal François Villon (best known through Ronald Colman’s… [read more]


  • Wednesday, April 1st, 8:00 pm JFK

    History. History lesson #3. A stubborn New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison (Kevin Costner) is convinced that the official story of Kennedy assassination is nothing but a cover up for a huge conspiracy. A highly controversial and still much-discussed legal thriller.

    “I think it was the most distressing film I’ve had to make [read more]


  • Thursday, April 2nd, 8:00 pm Petropolis: Aerial Perspectives on the Alberta Tar Sands and Water and Power

    Man-Altered Landscapes. The unspoiled boreal forests of northern Canada, compressed for 200 million years, have created the world’s second largest oil reserve, roughly the size of England. The tar sands, a mixture of sand and a heavy crude oil called bitumen, are mined in open pits after being forced to the surface by injecting superheated water into the ground. This massive industrialized mining effort has far-reaching impacts on the land, air, water, and climate although amazingly no comprehensive…[read more]


  • Friday, April 3rd, 8:00 pm The Leopard

    Technicolor. A grand scale epic, set in 1860s Sicily during the Risorgimento—the period that marked the end of Sicily’s existence as an independent monarchy and the emergence of an Italian state—The Leopard is a lavish, elegiac chronicle of the decline of an aristocratic family under the crushing weight of political change. Burt Lancaster is brilliant as the aging patriarch who can only stand aside and quietly observe his old ways being trampled…[read more]


  • Saturday, April 4th, 8:00 pm Spartacus

    Technicolor. Set in the first century BCE, this sweeping and subversive epic about the leader of a Roman slave rebellion has itself become something of an important historical event. The film’s success allowed the then-31-year-old Stanley Kubrick to pursue his directorial career relatively free from the demands of Hollywood. Kubrick balances the performances of a stellar cast—Kirk Douglas, Laurence Olivier…[read more]


  • Sunday, April 5th, 2:00 pm The Wizard of Oz

    Dryden Kids/Technicolor. If ever a film was meant to be seen on the big screen, this is it. Now a cultural icon, this adaptation of L. Frank Baum’s novel was one of the first films to be named to the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress. Judy Garland gives an endearing performance as the young Dorothy Gale, who is swept away by a tornado to the Land of Oz. A triumph of costumes, makeup, and set design, and featuring Harold Arlen’s Oscar-winning song “Over the Rainbow,” this film…[read more]


  • Monday, April 6th, 1:30 pm The Wizard of Oz

    Senior Matinee. Presented free to seniors (62+) on Monday afternoons through October. Beginning this March, our senior matinee screenings are fully incorporated into our regular film calendar. Cinematic classics from the George Eastman House collection will be presented in 35mm…[read more]


  • Tuesday, April 7th, 8:00 pm Tell Me Tonight

    James Card. Tell Me Tonight was part of “The Transition from Silence to Sound 1925–1933,” the very first series curator James Card programmed for the Dryden in 1951. Card may have scheduled the film as an example of an average early talkie, or perhaps an example of an imaginative, innovative use of sound. Who knows? What we do know is that he must have really liked the film, because he screened it no less than seven times in the first two decades of the Dryden… [read more]


  • Wednesday, April 8th, 8:00 pm The Green Berets

    History. History lesson #4. John Wayne directs John Wayne again, this time as an experienced colonel leading a squad of Green Berets to Vietnam, proclaiming that “out here, due process is a bullet,” and dead set to prevent the communist domination of the world.

    “A film so unspeakable, so stupid, so rotten and…[read more]


  • Thursday, April 9th, 8:00 pm Topophilia

    Man-Altered Landscape/World Premiere/Director in Person! Topophilia traces the 800-mile path of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) and examines one of the most historically productive oil routes in the United States. Completed in 1977, TAPS runs both above and underground through pristine Alaskan terrain—up mountain passes, over tundra, and across hundreds of rivers and streams. From numerous extraction points on the North Slope, hot crude oil is moved the entire length of Alaska to the…[read more]


  • Friday, April 10th, 8:00 pm Juliet of the Spirits

    Technicolor. Giulietta Masina plays a housewife who drifts into a private world of memories and fantasies to escape the hard facts of a philandering husband and a crumbling marriage. Fellini’s first color feature imagines his wife’s interior life through Technicolor compositions that transform the banal routine of her housebound existence into what one critic accurately described as “an imperial-sized fantasy of a physical opulence to make…[read more]


  • Saturday, April 11th, 8:00 pm Figures in a Landscape

    Technicolor. MacConnachie (Robert Shaw) and Ansell (Malcolm McDowell) are figures in a landscape, escaped prisoners of war of an unknown ethnicity, still handcuffed and on a desperate run across an unidentified hostile countryside, relentlessly hunted by a mysterious black helicopter while discussing everything—from contraception to psychoanalysis. Undoubtedly the most formally radical, almost experimental…[read more]


  • Sunday, April 12th, 2:00 pm For a Few Dollars More

    Technicolor. Clint Eastwood’s impossibly cool gunslinger returns in this sequel to Fistful of Dollars that places him in opposition to Mortimer, a determined bounty hunter (Lee Van Cleef), and Indio, a reckless bandit (Gian Maria Volonte), in a tense moral triangle with greed and revenge at its center. Massimo Dallamano’s cinematography captures gallons of blood and clouds of dust the way only…[read more]


  • Monday, April 13th, 1:30 pm Tell Me Tonight

    Senior Matinee. Presented free to seniors (62+) on Monday afternoons through October. Beginning this March, our senior matinee screenings are fully incorporated into our regular film calendar. Cinematic classics from the George Eastman House collection will be presented in 35mm… [read more]


  • Tuesday, April 14th, 8:00 pm Dodsworth

    James Card. Dodsworth, one of the most intelligent films of the 1930s, is a study of a marriage in crisis. Produced by the legendary Samuel Goldwyn and directed by the great William Wyler, Dodsworth was one of eight films the two collaborated on over the next ten years. Based on the Sinclair Lewis novel, Sidney Howard adapted his Broadway play to the screen and Walter Huston reprised his role of Sam Dodsworth, which he had played more than three hundred times on the stage…[read more]


  • Wednesday, April 15th, 8:00 pm Sarajevo

    History. History lesson #5. Shortly after his escape from Nazi Germany and before directing an unbroken chain of immortal classics such as Letter from an Unknown Woman, La ronde, Le plaisir, The Earrings of Madame de… and Lola Montès, the undisputed master of graceful camera choreography Max Ophüls crafted this poisonous cocktail of doomed romance in doomed times, both based on historic events. The Archduke Franz…[read more]


  • Thursday, April 16th, 8:00 pm California Company Town

    Man-Altered Landscapes. This strikingly shot essay film casts a probing, clear-eyed gaze at the landscape of California towns abandoned by the industries that created them—onetime boomtowns now haunted by the twilight of the American promise.

    “Appearing at a moment…[read more]


  • Friday, April 17th, 8:00 pm Barbarella

    Technicolor. The year is 40000, and positronic ray (“all persons and objects in its path are deminimumized to the 4th level”) inventor Dr. Durand Durand has disappeared. Jane Fonda is Barbarella, a cosmonaut in a capricious skintight space suit, in charge of bringing Durand Durand home safely. Crash landing on the planet Lythion, Barbarella meets a whole cast of unfamiliar creatures and contraptions…[read more]


  • Sunday, April 19th, 2:00 pm The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean

    Technicolor. In this film based on the true story of Pecos County, Texas, Justice of the Peace Roy Bean, director and co-screenwriter (with John Milius) dispenses with any attempt at character discovery and paints a brawling, tumultuous, and sometimes very funny portrait of the man-myth and his life in the dying days of the West. The always watchable and screen-filling Paul Newman is Judge Roy Bean…[read more]


  • Monday, April 20th, 1:30 pm Dodsworth

    Senior Matinee. Presented free to seniors (62+) on Monday afternoons through October. Beginning this March, our senior matinee screenings are fully incorporated into our regular film calendar. Cinematic classics from the George Eastman House collection will be presented in 35mm… [read more]


  • Tuesday, April 21st, 8:00 pm Pandora’s Box

    James Card. For James Card, there was only one Louise Brooks. The cineaste referred to his lifelong infatuation as an emotional devotion that had begun at the age of 14, calling Brooks an inadvertent femme fatale who could in no way be coquettish or even deliberately seductive—ideal for the role of Lulu in Pandora’s Box, heroine of Frank Wedekind’s beloved German plays. An innocently immoral sexual predator, Lulu discards …[read more]


  • Wednesday, April 22nd, 8:00 pm Team America: World Police

    History. History lesson #6. This provocative, volatile political essay from the hearts and minds behind the popular South Park television series clearly shows that Hollywood was concocting devious plans to assassinate popular Asian leaders already a decade ago. Multitalented Trey Parker (as Kim Jong Il, Matt Damon, Tim Robbins, Sean Penn, Michael Moore, Helen Hunt, and Susan Sarandon) and Matt Stone…[read more]


  • Sunday, April 26th, 2:00 pm Norte, The End of History

    Rochester Premiere. An embittered law student commits a brutal double murder; a family man takes the fall and is forced into a harsh prison sentence; a mother and her two children wander the countryside looking for some kind of redemption. Lav Diaz’s epic reimagining of Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment is… [read more]


  • Tuesday, April 28th, 8:00 pm Sucker Punch

    James Card. When we were thinking about how James Card, as an archivist and as a curator, would have felt and behaved in the 21st century—which films he would have collected and programmed?—and taking into consideration everything we knew about this beloved rogue as a human being and as a professional—from his passion for broad drama… [read more]


  • Wednesday, April 29th, 8:00 pm A Sampler of Cinematic Gems from the Museum’s Collection

    House Treasures. This is the inaugural program of a new series dedicated to the appreciation of George Eastman House’s renowned collection of over 28,000 films, carefully selected from the world’s cinematic legacy. The show begins with the amazing short film that paved the way to the introduction of sound, [Theodore W. Case Sound Test # 4: Canary][read more]